ENSAIOS PRÉ-SELECIONADOS PEF/2016

Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 01.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 02.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 03.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 04.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 05.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 06.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 07.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 08.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 09.

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Marika Dee. Havanas disenchanted youth. No tittle 10.

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MARIKA DEE

Cuba is struggling to keep its young population happy. Despite some recent changes on the island, the youthful alienation is

one of the biggest problems facing the government. Many young feel frustrated and trapped in an outmoded authoritarian society.

The last generation to grow up under the Castro's are largely alienated from the ideals of the revolution and detached from the Cuban way of politics. They don't want to experience the same economic hardships as their parents and long for freedom of speech and - maybe even more- economic opportunities. Some youngsters might have a wary sense of possibility these days,

but most still don't see a future for themselves in Cuba and dream of leaving the island. There is a widening gap between the have and have-nots. Cubans benefitting from remittances from family abroad or those with tourism jobs, have more chance of taking advantage of the new possibilities. Others risk being left out of the promise of prosperity brought on by economic reforms and a thaw in relations with the United States. The social gains of the revolution, mainly free education and health care, are valued but

no longer considered sufficient reasons to make sacrifices and endure austerity. Young people don't want to deal with low wages, food and supplies shortages, an infrastructure in disrepair and lack of housing. Despite modest changes and prospects of more to come, the rift between the promises of the government and the expectations of the young is widening. Cuba is at a crossroads

and its young generation is a potential explosive social group for the Castro government and its successors.